Lincoln Cathedral

Client:

Dean and Chapter of Lincoln Cathedral

Architect:

Buttress Fuller Alsop Williams, Manchester

Richard Woolley, the Principal of Brundell Woolley, has provided cost management services to the Dean & Chapter of Lincoln Cathedral since 1996.

Services have included the preparation of costed schedules for applications to English Heritage and grant awarding bodies, monitoring and reporting against ongoing expenditure and the preparation and submission of interim valuations and compilation of final accounts. Numerous projects have been undertaken totalling over £7m in value and these have included repairs to historic stained glass and leaded light windows, renewal of leadwork to roofs and gutters, conservation and repairs to stonework elevations, roof timber repairs and ‘one off’ schemes such as electrical re-wiring and fire alarm installations.

The Dean’s Eye window, a significant restoration and repair project, was finally completed in 2005 after many years of careful study, design and reconstruction. The medieval rose window dating back to 1220 had become dangerously unstable and required careful dismantling. The window was re-constructed using new stone tracery with the restored medieval glass protected by isothermal glazing. The project was the winning entry for the Building Conservation section of the RICS East Midlands Regional Awards in 2007.

Sheffield Cathedral Gateway Project

Client:

Chapter of Sheffield Cathedral

Architect:

Thomas Ford & Partners, London

The Gateway Project represents Sheffield Cathedral’s strategic vision for the future and is comprised of two specific elements, The Centenary Project and A Place For All People. The Centenary Project includes for new heating, stone flooring and seating within the main body of the Cathedral. A Place For All People Project formed the basis of a successful HLF Stage 1 application and is intended to create a new entrance facility, new lighting installations, new interpretation resources and improved external paved areas. Brundell Woolley provided detailed budget estimates for both projects and the client team is currently preparing the documentation for a stage 2 HLF application in 2012.

Howden Minster

Client:

Parish Church Council

Architect:

Wiles and Maguire, York

The Church of St. Peter and St. Paul, Howden Minster, is a significant Grade I listed church located in the East Riding of Yorkshire. The Minster is principally built of magnesian limestone with copper sheeted roofs.

The west front and pinnacles were subject to a careful scheme of restoration supported by the ‘Repair Grants for Places of Worship in England’ under the stewardship of English Heritage and the Heritage Lottery Fund. The project involved the careful replacement of eroded stone ashlars and carved work, extensive re-pointing and the partial rebuilding of unstable pinnacles.

English Heritage continued with their support for the next two phases of work which involved renewal of roof coverings to the grammar school roof, masonry repairs to the north and south clerestorey walls and masonry repairs to the grammar school wall and pinnacles. The north and south clerestorey leaded light windows were also skillfully restored.

The three phases of work totalled £900,000.

All Saints Church, Beckingham

Client:

Parish Church Council

Architect:

Scorer and Hawkins, Horncastle

All Saints Church (near Newark-on-Trent) is a fine medieval church dating back to the 12th C. The church was declared unsafe for use in the 1990’s and was closed for 10 years whilst efforts were made to secure funding for repairs.

Funding was eventually provided via the ‘Repair Grants for Places of Worship in England’ under the stewardship of English Heritage and the Heritage Lottery Fund.

The work involved the renewal of lead coverings to the nave and north aisle roofs, repairs to historic timbers and boarding and an element of stonework reconstruction to the west wall of the north aisle. New rainwater goods and associated underground drainage runs were also installed.

A second phase of work was then supported by English Heritage which involved the renewal of the south aisle and south roof coverings and repairs to historic glazing to the north and south aisle windows.

This important grade I building was featured in the BBC Restoration Village series broadcast in 2006

The Church of St. Thomas, Market Rasen

Client:

Parish Church Council

Architect:

GMS Architecture, Louth

The Church is medieval in origin and was substantially remodelled in 1862.

The tower stonework was identified as an area of the building requiring urgent repair with failure of the buttresses being of particular concern.Re-roofing of the nave and aisle roofing slates was also prioritised. The project was supported by the ‘Repair Grants for Places of Worship in England’ under the stewardship of English Heritage and the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Works included the replacement of the majority of the tower buttress stonework, renewal of the badly worn belfry window surrounds, general re-pointing in lime mortar and replacement of eroded ashlar stonework, renewal of rainwater goods and recovering of the slate roofs.

St Mary’s Church, Horncastle

Client:

Parish Church Council

Architect:

Scorer & Hawkins, Horncastle

This 13th Century Church was supported by an English Heritage repairs grant. The project involved significant repairs to the historic nave roof timber structure, renewal of the leadwork coverings, stonework repairs to the clerestorey window tracery and repairs to the lead light clerestorey windows.